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5 Ways to Reduce the Cost of Addiction Treatment

 

Drug addiction treatment can get expensive, and at times, may even seem impossible to cover. In fact, addiction treatment costs can be about $135 per day for outpatient treatment and more than $700 per day for inpatient treatment. Since these costs are high, many addicts end up not seeking treatment. However, addiction treatment may actually be more affordable than you think if you know where to look. Here are five free and lower cost options that can help reduce the costs of addiction treatment.

  1. Find Free Addiction Services
  2. Free addiction services are rare, but they do exist. Certain states and municipalities have tax or donor funded addiction treatment programs to help those in need. These programs tend to be harder to find, as they are not widely advertised like programs which can cost a significant amount. Finding free treatment may require a good amount of time on the phone with local government institutions. Once free services are located, there tends to be an extensive amount of associated paperwork such as providing recent tax documents, pay stubs, and proof of financial duress that would merit an addiction treatment program at no cost.

  3. Loan Companies That Specialize in Addiction Treatment Financing
  4. Many organizations and companies are geared specifically for financing drug rehab programs. By spreading out the cost of rehab over an extended period, addiction treatment costs can be far more manageable. Most of these institutions offer loan options which are affordable. They also offer packages with interest rates that are lower and friendlier than most credit cards or health care program funding.

  5. Use Your Addiction Treatment as a Tax Deduction
  6. The Internal Revenue Service instituted a medical cost tax deduction several years ago. Medical addiction treatment is generally considered to fall into this category, with the payee being allowed to deduct the cost of their addiction treatment if it accounts for more than 10% of their gross yearly income. This deduction is especially helpful for those with lower incomes as it can essentially ensure a much higher tax refund, and under certain circumstances, a bonus return beyond any payments initially made to the IRS. In these cases, it is safest to have a tax expert help with the tax return in regards to addiction treatment to ensure everything is properly and legally filed.

  7. Addiction Treatment Programs May be Covered By Insurance
  8. Thanks to the Mental Health and Addiction Equity Act, more medical insurance companies are including at least some form of financial assistance to help their users cover addiction treatment costs. This act did not mandate that insurance companies offer help for such programs, but did force companies that offer such help to provide higher levels of coverage. While your insurer may not cover the full amount, most programs will subsidize a portion of your addiction treatment. Figuring out whether or not your insurance can cover any of these costs can usually be discovered with a short phone call or email to your insurer. Once it is determined whether or not addiction treatment plans are covered, they can then help you find the facilities where treatment will be covered as well as helping nail down the cheapest options available to you.

  9. Addiction Treatment Programs with Scaled Fees
  10. While not every addiction treatment facility or program has a scaled fee program, many offer rates based on your income. Such programs can go a long way toward saving you money and offering addiction treatment at a cost that is manageable for your level of income.

    The easiest way to locate treatment that operates on the sliding scale is to call the National Drug Abuse Hotline at 1-800-662-HELP. A major portion of the hotline’s job is to help provide people with affordable programs in their area. By asking specifically for addiction treatments that scale according to income, representatives can more easily help you find a program that works for both your mental and financial needs.

    Along with the national hotline, each state has their own divisions to deal with substance abuse or mental health. These programs tend to be controlled in small geographic areas to better manage the needs of the given populace. Nearly all of such government available programs operate on a sliding fee scale.

Addiction Treatment Can Be Affordable

When searching for addiction treatment, you should not have to stress over costs. Achieving recovery is much more important than worrying about finances. The five options listed above will greatly help you find more affordable, and in some cases, free options for addiction treatment.

Are you or someone you love suffering from a drug addiction and would like help finding affordable addiction treatment options? Call our addiction advisors at 1-800-259-1361.

Sources

http://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/drugfacts/treatment-approaches-drug-addiction

http://www.recovery.org/topics/financing-recovery-to-get-help-now-and-pay-over-time/

http://addictionblog.org/FAQ/costs/how-much-does-addiction-treatment-cost/

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