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7 Goals Every Recovering Addict Should Have

 

When you’re in recovery for alcoholism or drug addiction, it’s always a good idea to have some ongoing goals to keep you focused and creating forward momentum. After all, feeling stuck and apathetic about life can become a trigger that could lead you back to drinking. To continue to grow mind, body, and spirit, consider adding some or all of the following goals as you walk the road of recovery.

  1. Be honest with yourself. Honesty is an important virtue. Many active addicts have spent some time lying to themselves and others, but when they get into recovery, they discover that honesty helps them to grow and it also helps nurture and build relationships. Make it your goal to continue to be honest with yourself and others. Admitting that you were an alcoholic in need of help is a wonderful way to practice honesty with yourself. Continue this kind of honesty as you move forward making changes in your life.
  2. Build a support network. Having support and solid, healthy relationships can be quite helpful on your recovery journey. Take some time to cultivate a handful of supportive people in which you can develop meaningful friendships and connections. You may include people like your sponsor (if you have one), your good friends, others in recovery, a life coach or mentor, a counselor, and so on. Having a supportive network will certainly help you grow in many ways and may help you avoid relapsing. While you’re building your support network, consider weeding out those people who encourage you to drink or enable you. Such negative influences will make it difficult to move forward in recovery, so cutting down time with them or cutting ties completely is a good idea.
  3. Have active short and long-term goals. Take the time to formulate short and long-term goals for yourself, as this helps you keep momentum going. Be sure to create an action plan to take steps toward fulfilling these goals.
  4. Work on emotional sobriety. If you’re struggling with negative emotions or if you simply want to grow more emotionally, work on managing your emotions. For example, if you are prone to angry reactions that you regret, work on anger management skills. You may need some help with gaining emotional balance, so feel free to ask for help if you’re struggling.
  5. Try new things. Too much idle time is not a good thing, so be willing to try some new activities. Maybe you’ll benefit from a new hobby or perhaps join that recreational sports team you’ve been talking about. Make a list of things you’d like to try or that you miss doing and go ahead and make time for them.
  6. Rebuild any lost bridges in relationships. Some people in recovery have burned some bridges with family and/or friends while in active addiction, so one goal you can have is to begin to rebuild those relationships one step at a time.
  7. Feed your soul. Just like your physical body needs nourishing food, your spirit needs some nourishment too. Maybe you like to read books that inspire you or listen to music. Some people may like to get out in nature to feel fulfilled. Discover what feeds your soul and make time for that.

Being in recovery is a wonderful thing because you’re free from the bondage of addiction and you have a new clarity on things. Consider these goals and implement them in your life. You can create a beautiful life for yourself one day at a time. Give yourself permission to do so!


“Dominica-Applegate”Dominica Applegate is dedicated to the art of self-discovery and creative expression with a passion for creative art. She’s got a deep-rooted passion for helping others heal emotional pain and trauma, as her own journey through love addiction has served as a catalyst for her own healing and beautiful transformation. Find out more at www.dominicaapplegate.com.

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