You CAN live a SOBER LIFE again - CALL NOW for treatment options
1-800-259-1361

Dry January: Can You Give Up Drinking for 31 Days?

 

With the New Year just around the corner many people are already thinking of their New Year’s resolutions. Whether it’s losing that 10 pounds or starting the fitness center membership back up, January is a great time to set some new goals! With that in mind, many people around the world are joining in on Dry January, which is an initiative and challenge to go without consuming any alcohol for the 31 days of January. Why? Well, some people simply want to give their bodies a break and others may want to challenge themselves to see if they can even do it!

Over 2 million people last year cut down or did not drink at all in January via the Dry January initiative. The 2016 challenge is underway and many have signed up already, ready to take a long break from alcohol or quit completely. Are you up for the challenge?

The Benefits of 31 Days Without Alcohol

Even if you’re just a social drinker, you’ll benefit from putting down the drink for the month of January. First, you’ll save some money, as you know drinks can run deep into your pocketbook. Another benefit is that you’ll give your body a chance to get rid of any toxins related to your drinking. While you’re at it, you can make a commitment to eating healthier, which is a win-win situation. You may even find that you are sleeping better and certainly no hangovers is a plus.

Research has been conducted on the benefits of this short break-up with alcohol. Fourteen employees who work at the British magazine New Scientist volunteered to commit to Dry January and reported pleasant results. Ten of the employees gave up alcohol completely and the other four kept drinking as they normally would. Keep in mind that drinking in Britain is a fairly popular pastime.

The Results

A liver specialist from the Institute for Liver and Digestive Health at University College London went through the results and determined those who stopped drinking had indeed experienced positive health results. Liver fat, which the liver accumulates when one drinks, can cause liver damage. This level of fat actually decreased in those who stopped drinking by 15% for most of the participants and 20% for a few. Additionally, those who stopped drinking experienced a decrease in blood glucose levels, lowering their chances of developing diabetes.

This is not a huge surprise, as liver specialists assert that the main reasons for liver fat accumulation is the consumption of alcohol and obesity. If you decrease your intake of alcohol considerably, you’re more apt to see a decrease in liver fat.

Granted, stopping drinking for one month is not going to be enough to keep the positive benefits. The Dry January initiative does help many people see that they can indeed live life without consuming alcohol and for others it might make them aware that they have a problem with alcohol, evident in the fact that they might struggle with stopping.

Regardless of the reasoning to sign up for Dry January, you’ll most likely walk away with some valuable lessons, perhaps shed a few pounds, and feel better in general. Experts warn not to get through Dry January and then binge in February, as this can certainly do some harm.

If you’re interested in signing up, learn more at Dry January.


“Dominica-Applegate”Dominica Applegate is dedicated to the art of self-discovery and creative expression with a passion for creative art. She’s got a deep-rooted passion for helping others heal emotional pain and trauma, as her own journey through love addiction has served as a catalyst for her own healing and beautiful transformation. Find out more at www.dominicaapplegate.com.

Related Articles

What to Avoid to Maintain Long-Term Recovery Complacency is the biggest pitfall in the pursuit of both long-term sobriety and recovery. It’s a point at which we stop growing, seeking new challenges, actively learning, and/or healing. To allow st...
Is Recovery Possible Without AA? When it comes to recovery, it seems there is one method that is the most recommended and most talked about. Alcoholics Anonymous is a 12-step program that was created in the 1930s as a way to save tho...
The Insidious Nature of Enabling When seeking intervention services for loved ones, family and friends are often surprised to find their own behavior questioned. Any experienced clinician will be looking for how those closest to an a...
How Exercise and Nature Helps With Addiction Recovery There are numerous options that can help you with addiction recovery, including 12-Step meetings, counseling centers, or a religious institution. There’s not necessarily a right or wrong and the choic...
10 Best Movies About Drug Addiction When you’re in recovery from or drug addiction, you want to feed your soul things that nourish and inspire you. A great way to be encouraged in your recovery and be entertained at the same time is to ...
Dear Non-Addict, I Don’t Love Using Dear Non-Addict, You’re wrong about a lot of things. In hopes of dispelling some myths, I felt compelled to write you this letter. First and foremost, I didn’t wake up one day and say, “I want to a...
Managing Chronic Pain While in Recovery According to the National Institute On Drug Abuse, doctors treat more than 100 million patients in the U.S. for chronic pain, including some in the recovery phase of addiction treatment. The challenge...
What Not to Say to Someone in Recovery Communication is an essential part of the recovery process for anyone learning to cope with the many complex physical and emotional issues related to their addiction. An equally important part of trea...
10 Signs That You’re in Recovery “Before you can live, a part of you has to die. You have to let go of what could have been, how you should have acted and what you wish you would have said differently. You have to accept that you can...
Veterans, Substance Abuse, and PTSD: Help is Available People who suffer from Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) have a higher rate of substance abuse than those who do not. The traumas they have experienced may seem too overwhelming and heavy, so they...
Overcoming the Fear of Making Decisions in Recovery One of the most annoying things about talking to a counselor is that we'll often answer a question with a question. The best of us do this because we seek to foster increased confidence and improved i...
Moving On From My Boss, The Addict He was a local celebrity and quite famous in his own right. I was more than flattered when he chose me to be part of this new company he had just opened. From being complete strangers, he became my bo...