You CAN live a SOBER LIFE again - CALL NOW for treatment options
1-800-259-1361

House Passes CARA Bill to Fight Opioid Epidemic

 

The U.S. House of Representatives passed the Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act (CARA) Friday in a unanimous vote of 407-5 to fight the opioid epidemic. With existing support from the Senate, the bill is expected to swiftly move from Congress to President Obama for approval.

While CARA has both passed the House and Senate, there are still some disagreements on exactly how much funding will be allocated towards treatment services. Earlier this year, President Obama proposed $1.1 billion, but many Democrats and Republicans refused to sign it due to the belief there was not enough available funding to make that possible. Due to Friday’s vote, funding is expected to be about $500 million, yet no firm number is decided.

CARA will help fund opioid and heroin prevention, treatment and recovery programs. Title III and IV of CARA explain how funds will be distributed. See these details on the bill here.

While funding is still being determined, many addiction and recovery groups are celebrating any funding since people are continuing to die daily from the opioid epidemic. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than 40 Americans die every day from prescription opioid overdoses.

The passage of CARA will make significant improvements for people struggling with opioid addiction, including:

  • Expanding drug and alcohol prevention and education
  • Increasing the availability of Narcan (Naloxone)
  • Elevating more collaboration with law enforcement and criminal justice systems
  • Creating more disposal and turn-in sites for unwanted prescription medications
  • Increasing availability of treatment including medication-assisted and evidence-based programs
  • Creating prescription drug monitoring programs to help at-risk individuals access critical services

Along with these improvements, CARA will also revise policies to enable doctors to prescribe medications that will help treat addiction and even provide more education programs for doctors to ensure that they adhere to prescriber guidelines.

Earlier this year, the CDC issued a series of guidelines that all medical professionals need to follow when prescribing opioids. These guidelines are also being incorporated into the curriculum of medical schools across the nation. CARA will help to expand on the guidelines set by the CDC.

CARA is just one of many efforts by the federal government to fight the opioid epidemic. Last week, the Obama Administration eased its cap on buprenorphine, a medication prescribed by doctors to treat opioid addiction. The measure increases the number of patients physicians can treat with the drug from 100 to 275. An implant of buprenorphine, which slowly releases low doses of drug over a six month period, has also been approved the the Food and Drug Administration.

While CARA is definitely a step in the right direction, there is still more that needs to be done to fight the opioid epidemic. State governments need to continue to create laws that will place limits on opioid prescriptions. States can also encourage doctors to offer alternative therapies wherever possible.

If you or a loved one currently have an opioid addiction, there is help. Call The Addiction Advisor helpline and learn about treatment options at 1-800-259-1361.

Related Articles

The Role of a Substance Abuse Program Sponsor Millions of Americans are addicted to drugs and alcohol, and the first step toward an ultimately successful treatment is finding a sponsor to introduce them to a recovery program to help them stay sob...
What Not to Say to Someone in Recovery Communication is an essential part of the recovery process for anyone learning to cope with the many complex physical and emotional issues related to their addiction. An equally important part of trea...
Addicted to Love: The Do’s and Don’ts of Loving an Addict Step right up, folks! It’s the scariest coaster in the park. Enter if you dare. And mark my words--by the time it’s over, you won’t know up from down! You are in love with an addict and, as a resul...
Is Your Marriage or Relationship Affected by Addiction? We all know addiction is bad for the person who’s using, but it can profoundly affect the people who love the addict as well. The direct problems affecting an intimate relationship are complex when ad...
Internet Addiction Changes Brain Similar to Heroin Internet addiction might cause the same brain changes that are seen in drug addicts and alcoholics, according to new research. In one study, published in the Jan. 11 issue of PLoS One, researchers ...
The Smallest Victim of Addiction During Pregnancy Unfortunately, the use of illicit drugs during pregnancy is not as uncommon as many individuals may think. Such abuse may include the use or misuse of prescription medication, street drugs such as her...
Leftover Prescription Painkillers Contribute to Opioid Epidemic About six in 10 patients that receive prescription painkillers end up with leftover pills and many plan to save them for later use, according to a new John Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health su...
How Addiction Affects Relationships I have treated many people over the past two decades in my psychotherapy practice who have sought my help in addressing relationship issues that happen as a result of addiction. Typically there are tw...
How To Approach Goal Setting with Your Addicted Loved One Consider a child’s first visit to the beach. The crashing waves on the shore and the sheer vastness of the water can prove quite scary and overwhelming. You don’t throw your child in. Instead, you fet...
Utah Becomes First State to Declare Porn a ‘Health Hazard’ Utah Gov. Gary Herbert signed two pieces of legislation Tuesday, one of which makes the Beehive State the first in the nation to officially declare porn a “public health hazard.” One is a resolutio...
How to Recognize Addictive Behaviors The number of addicts in the United States continues to reach epidemic proportions, from the 24.6 million people who abuse illicit substances, as estimated by the National Survey on Drug Use and Healt...
Global Drug Addiction: A Challenge for Scientists According to the World Health Organization, there are nearly 200 million illicit drug users in the world. Drug abuse and dependency is a global concern requiring input from scientists around the world...

Leave a Reply