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How Much Does Addiction Treatment Cost?

 

According to the National Survey on Drug Use and Health, the second most common reason people did not receive substance abuse treatment is due to a lack of financial resources or a lack of health insurance. This follows the No. 1 reason, which is that many people are not ready to stop abusing drugs or alcohol. These statistics beg the question, “How much does addiction treatment cost?”

There really is no easy answer to this question because the cost will largely depend on the types of treatment you need for your addiction. There are multiple different factors, however, that will determine the overall cost, including whether you need inpatient or outpatient care, medications, or detox.

Addiction Treatment Costs

The following are the costs for inpatient and outpatient treatment, medications, and detox.

  • Inpatient Treatment Costs: Inpatient treatment is often the most expensive, but like in all cases of addiction treatment, it largely depends on the type of treatment and the needs of the individual. Some inpatient addiction treatment centers may cost about $6,000 for a 30-day program. Centers that are more well-known tend to cost up to $20,000 for a 30-day program. If you need a 60- to 90-day program, the total average cost could be anywhere between $12,000 and $60,000.
  • Outpatient Treatment Costs: Outpatient treatment is usually much more affordable than inpatient treatment in many cases. Programs for mild to moderate addictions cost about $5,000 on average for a three month program. Outpatient detox programs cost about $1,000 to $1,500 in total. The price for these programs can vary depending on the type of care you require, the frequency of visits, as well as the price of any medications you will need.
  • Medications: Medications can get expensive quickly. It’s important to note that not all medications will be affordable and some will not even be covered by insurance. The following are the most common types of medication as well as their costs:
    • Suboxone: Approximately $353 for a 30-day supply; About $4,236 for a year
    • Buprenorphine: About $360 per month for a 30-day supply; Around $4,320 for a year
    • Methadone: About $400 for a 30-day supply; Around $4,700 for a year
    • Naltrexone: About $1,000 for a 30-day supply; Around $12,000 for a year
  • Detox: Many addiction treatment programs will require a detox. This can cost about $1,000 to $1,500 on average. It’s important to note that many inpatient programs will include the cost of detox in the program.

How to Reduce the Cost of Addiction Treatment

The costs for addiction treatment can be overwhelming, but the good news is there are multiple options and insurance companies may even help cover some, if not all of the cost. Under Obamacare, health plans in the insurance marketplace are required to include coverage for addiction treatment. There are also financing options that may be available to help make the cost more affordable over a longer period of time.

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