You CAN live a SOBER LIFE again - CALL NOW for treatment options
1-800-259-1361

Recovery Begins With Getting Real With Yourself

 

Sometimes when it comes to addiction, the last person to really come to terms with an active addiction is the user. Yes, admitting that you are an alcoholic or drug addict is not the easiest thing to do and continued denial can be tempting, but if you want to really get a grip on your life and stop the addiction, you’ve got to get very real and honest with yourself.

Honesty is a necessary characteristic for moving forward in recovery. For example, if you are struggling with cutting drinking out of your life, yet you tell yourself that you can do it if you keep trying or that it’s not as bad as others make it out to be, then you’re not being honest with yourself. People in general, and especially those in addiction, tend to view their lives based upon their intentions and not necessarily the facts, so they think they’re doing better than they actually are.

Rebuilding Your Life in Recovery

If you’re serious about wanting a new life outside of alcohol or drugs, you’ve got to get very real and honest about your life. Once you enter into recovery and abstain from substances, it is quite helpful to move forward being honest with yourself and others. Rebuilding your life in recovery requires honesty if you want to thrive. Those that continue lying to themselves and others tend to live a life that is unfulfilling and are much more likely to relapse.

The Dishonest Days Are Over

Many people in active addiction lie about all sorts of things. Whether it’s lying to a boss about why you’re late for work, to your spouse as to where your money went, or to your children regarding why you missed parents night at school, dishonesty abounds in the life of many addicts. Now that you’re serious about recovery, the dishonest days are over. You do not have to lie about anything anymore and this should feel refreshing! Commit to a life of honesty with yourself and with others. This is a great avenue for personal growth as honesty just makes you feel better about yourself all the way around.

Why People Lie in Recovery

Why would people continue to lie in recovery? Well, for some people lying has become such a habit that they have a tough time stopping. Before they know it, they’ve told a lie automatically, so you’ve got to really become conscious of your thoughts before you speak them. It may take some time and coming clean if you do slip to get into the habit of being dishonest. For others, they may lie because they don’t want to contend with negative consequences or judgments from people. They may not like conflict, so they lie to keep the waters smooth. Still, for others, they may not even realize they are lying because they’ve lied to themselves so much that they are self-deluded and not able to own their reality.

Lying Can Lead to Relapse

Plenty of men and women in recovery can tell you how lying led them right back into drinking or drugging, as it is a common relapse trigger. Maybe they’ve lied to cope with something in life and the lies can cause them to feel badly about themselves, making them more likely to self-medicate to numb that pain. Even telling just a little lie can bring on some guilt and it can also prevent some healing that may need to occur in your life.

How to Become Honest

Getting real and honest with yourself requires a firm commitment. It may take some time to get into the habit of honesty, but it’s possible. Also, if you do catch yourself lying, promptly make it right. Make the necessary apologies and keep moving. Don’t beat yourself up about it; simply keep doing the right thing and you’ll get into the swing of honesty before you know it. When you value honesty, you’ll be more apt to follow through with your commitment.

Everyone has a choice as to whether to live an honest life or allow dishonesty to have a hold. Being honest is certainly not easy all the time, but as you progress in being honest with yourself and others, you’ll realize that as a result you feel happier and more at peace. You’ll notice feelings like guilt and shame melting away, which will feel incredibly good. Make a commitment to being more real and honest with yourself and others. You’ll be super glad you did.


“Dominica-Applegate”Dominica Applegate is dedicated to the art of self-discovery and creative expression with a passion for creative art. She’s got a deep-rooted passion for helping others heal emotional pain and trauma, as her own journey through love addiction has served as a catalyst for her own healing and beautiful transformation. Find out more at www.dominicaapplegate.com.

Related Articles

5 Ways To Know It’s Safe to Return To A Relationship With An Addict You have succeeded in setting boundaries between yourself and your addicted loved one. The relationship is not over, but rather “on pause” until you have witnessed sufficient progress in his or her re...
What to Expect When You Enter Addiction Counseling The decision to seek help is a critical step in the recovery process. Addiction cannot be navigated alone and by enlisting the support of professionals, you can begin an individualized journey that ad...
Veterans, Substance Abuse, and PTSD: Help is Available People who suffer from Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) have a higher rate of substance abuse than those who do not. The traumas they have experienced may seem too overwhelming and heavy, so they...
Why Treating Addiction as a Disease Isn’t Helpful We are taught in contemporary America that addiction is a chronic disease. This pronouncement is given by the NIDA, NIAAA, ASAM, and other government and non-profit addiction agencies and is unquestio...
Lindsay Lohan’s Dad: ‘I Feel Responsible for Lindsay’s Addiction’ In a recent interview with The Addiction Advisor, actress Lindsay Lohan’s dad, Michael Lohan, said he feels responsible for his daughter’s drug addiction. “People ask me all the time, ‘do I feel re...
10 Signs That You Have a Substance Abuse Problem “I used to refer to my drug use as putting the monster in the box. I wanted to be less, so I took more - simple as that.” - Carrie Fisher, Wishful Drinking In the clinical world of drug and alcohol...
Hypnosis for Addictions Like many people, my first impressions of hypnosis were on TV, on stage, and in the movies, where it was used almost exclusively for entertainment. It wasn’t until I studied therapeutic hypnosis in gr...
Dr. Oz: ‘The Face of Addiction Has Changed’ Dr. Mehmet Oz, host of the nationally syndicated “The Dr. Oz Show,” was recently the headline speaker at the UNITE to Face Addiction rally in Washington D.C., where he said “the face of addiction in A...
10 Signs You Are Headed For Relapse “Let us not look back in anger or forward in fear, but around in awareness.” - James Thurber According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, “Relapse rates … for people with addiction and other ...
Surviving the Holidays with Your Sobriety Intact Maintaining sobriety during the holidays can feel like walking blindfolded through a field of landmines. Whether you’re navigating holiday parties, family get-togethers, or a simple holiday shopping t...
Forgiveness in the Recovery Journey “Bring it up, make amends, forgive yourself. It sounds simple, but don’t think for a second that it is easy. Getting free from the tyranny of past mistakes can be hard work, but definitely worth the e...
Coping in Early Recovery With H.A.L.T. There's a useful acronym used by members of 12-step programs called H.A.L.T. It stands for Hungry, Angry, Lonely, and Tired. This tool works as both a preventative measure and as a diagnostic tool. We...